Thank you for coming to our gallery! Please enjoy some short movies of our computational results.

Falling 3D rectangular object in vertical water duct (2007)

To predict the motions of falling objects in fluids, it is necessary to deal with the fluid-structure interactions adequately.

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Dam-break flows through buildings (2007)

Our multiphase computational method allows us to calculate 3D free-surface flows through complicated-shaped buildings. The Tsunami-like flows are caused by a dam-break condition and the buildings are small scale (1/30) models based on actual city maps.

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Free-surface flows over stacked spheres (2006)

The stacked spheres simulate a permeable dam, created just by stacking up natural stones. Our computational method can estimate fluid forces acting on the spheres without empirical constants, such as resistance and lift coefficients. It has been confirmed that the predicted "dam-breaking" processes are in good agreement with experimental ones.

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Cubic objects transported by wave-induced flows (2007)

Various objects on the near-shore regions are possibly swept away by Tsunami flows. Our computational method was applied to a simple experiment, in which eight cubic objects are transported by wave-induced flows colliding with two fixed cylindrical objects.

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Finite deformation of elastic plate in 3D cavity flow (2009)

This movie shows the finite deformation of a flexible plate fixed on the bottom surface of a 3D box. The plate is largely deformed by the viscous flows created by the moving top surface.

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Many arbitrarily shaped solid objects transported by free-surface flows (2014)

A parallel computation method has been developed to predict the motions of arbitrarily shaped solid objects transported in 3D free-surface flows, taking account of their collisions and fluid-solid mechanical interactions. The present parallelization is based on a domain decomposition method using flat MPI. In order to improve the load-balancing in case that nonuniform distributions of many objects arise in the computational area, the size of the sub-domains, which are used for the computations of solid objects, can be changed according to the number of the objects included in the sub-domains.
Numerical experiments were conducted for 1,000,000 spheroids, each of which consists of 121 tetrahedron elements, transported by the free-surface flows caused by a dam-break condition. All spheroids have the same density as the liquid phase and they collide with each other in the movements. While we tried to enlarge a part of the computational results so that you can see each spheroid, can you see such behaviors?

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